neurocinema

Coming Soon!

"Gleason" to be screened in our upcoming Neurocinema festival is a fabulous documentary from the 2016 Sundance Film Festival which goes inside the life of Steve Gleason, the former New Orleans Saints defensive back who, at the age of 34, was diagnosed with ALS and given a life expectancy of maximum two to five years. Weeks later, Gleason found out his wife, Michel, was expecting their first child. A video journal that began as a gift for his unborn son expands to chronicle Steve's determination to get his relationships in order, build a foundation to provide other ALS patients with purpose, and adapt to his declining physical condition-utilizing medical technologies that offer the means to live as fully as possible.

This is a truly remarkable humanistic approach to the end of someone's life which certainly illuminates us clinicians and the public as a whole. Download a flyer here.

marquee image -courtesy of pixabay-public domain image

Neuro-Cinema at the Annual San Francisco Neurological Society Meeting

Film directors are often able to recognize how neurologic disease impacts the mind and affects personality, and frequently depict these unique features very accurately and in great detail through rather poignant scenes. Audiences watching such film content are easily transported into these very distinct and unusual worlds and can immediately ingest the informative as well as educational value contained within it.

For at least four decades excellent directors, scriptwriters and producers have produced deeply moving and rather memorable major feature films depicting the reality of neurologic disease in extraordinarily intimate detail. Their cinema says as much about consequences as it says about the specific neurological disorder being explored. Main themes include sudden confrontation with major neurological disorders or the variety of serious disabilities associated with chronic neurological illness, and the challenge to lead a normal life.

We began presenting movies with neurological themes (neuro-cinema) at the San Francisco Neurological Society almost a decade ago. Since then, we have watched numerous feature films and enjoyed animated and rewarding discussions after watching them. We originally screened an assortment of movies each conference, but eventually settled on screening a single movie in order to maximize the number of participants in post-screening discussions.

The interest in neuro-cinema at the SFNS annual conference has grown exponentially and we hope this trend will continue. We are convinced this activity benefits our growth as professionals and, most importantly, we believe it actually helps us improve our interaction with our own patients and the communities we serve.

Sincerely,
Oscar Abeliuk MD
Neurologist / Filmmaker
Cultural Director SFNS